International cricket could welcome concussion substitutes | Daily News
MCC committee set to discuss new rule at meeting in Bangalore:

International cricket could welcome concussion substitutes

Batsman Perera rubs his head as a member of medical staff walks onto the pitch to treat him.
Batsman Perera rubs his head as a member of medical staff walks onto the pitch to treat him.

Concussion substitutes in international cricket could come a step closer this week following concerns over Sri Lanka's handling of an incident in Australia last month.

Batsman Kusal Perera retired hurt after being hit on the head by seamer Jhye Richardson during the second Test in Canberra, and was advised by the Australian team doctor not to bat in the second innings. But Sri Lanka, who did not have a doctor of their own, ignored the advice. He was out for a duck.

Concussion experts warn that a second blow soon after the first can be fatal. With the death of Test batsman Phillip Hughes, who was hit by a bouncer in late 2014, still fresh in Australian minds, their players were said to be shocked that Perera batted again.

Now MCC's influential world cricket committee are set to discuss the issue at their meeting in Bangalore, with a view to putting pressure on national boards ahead of an ICC meeting in May.

Both England and Australia are sympathetic to the idea of introducing like-for-like concussion substitutes to the international arena, following successful trials at domestic level in both countries. At the moment, the regulations allow for fielding substitutes, but not replacement batsmen or bowlers.

The ICC have been monitoring those trials, which were introduced on a voluntary basis in 2017, but say they won't make any decision until October at the earliest.

That raises the possibility that new protocols will be in place for England's trip to New Zealand at the end of the year.

MCC this week introduced a new eLearning module on their website to educate cricketers, especially those at grassroots level, about how to deal with concussion.

– Daily Mail


 

Add new comment